Saturday, August 31, 2013

My Blenheim Project - Webb's Brigade

Ray King - Webb's brigade only consisted of 4 battalions and positioned in the centre of the field...
Churchill's Regiment of Foot "The Buffs" 
Lt.Colonel Commanding Henry Peyton (Wounded in Action)
Raised in 1664 and in 1751 renamed the 3rd Regiment of Foot.
Their 1704 campaign establishment was 31 officers & 559 men
Painted byBob Lorton

Webb's Regiment of Foot 
Lt.Colonel Commanding Richard Sutton.
Raised in 1685 and in 1751 renamed the 8th Regiment of Foot.
Their 1704 campaign establishment was 35 officers & 704 men
Painted by Bob Lorton

Meredyth's Regiment of Foot 
Lt. Colonel Commanding Thomas Bellew.
Raised in 1702 and in 1751 renamed 37th Foot "Hampshire".
Their 1704 campaign establishment was 32 officers & 543 men
Painted by Bob Lorton

Orkney's Regiment of Foot (1st Battalion) 
Colonel George Earl of Orkney, Lt.Colonel Commanding John White (K.I.A.)
Raised in 1660 and in 1751 renamed the 1st Royal Scots Regiment of Foot.
Their 1704 campaign establishment was 38 officers & 601 men
Painted by  Bob Lorton

  You can find more about the Blenheim project on the Fighting Talk Forum. For a quick way to see all of Ray's collection, type 'Blenheim' in the search bar at the top of the page! 

Friday, August 30, 2013

FEATURED REGIMENT: Dal Regiment

Bart Vetters - The Swedish Dal Regementet (Regiment) during the Great Northern War was one of the 'high profile' regiments that were present in all of the major battles and spent most of their time, certainly during the 'main event' of the 1708-1709 Russian campaign, as part of the King's Army. The were one of the standard 'Indelta' regiments, which were raised from specific provinces in Sweden, in this case the Dalarna province in central Sweden. The Indelta regiments (the name comes from the name of the recruitment system itself, 'Indelningsverket', and has nothing to do with any river delta anywhere, something that still occasionally confuses me :) ) were the closest thing to a regular army that existed at the time of the Great Northern War and were thus ususally the best equipped and trained.

The Dal regiment was sent to Zeeland with the rest of the King's army and stayed with it until a fateful summer day on the dusty plain near Poltava in the Ukraine. It thus participated in all of the battles of the King's army, including the ones of Karl's 1708 - 1709 Russian campaign (the second and - unfortunately for Karl - a campaign too far). By the time of that campaign, the Dalcarla ('men from Dalarna', and often mistakenly used as the name of the regiment) had obviously become somewhat of a favourite of Karl's - not always a good thing if you're looking for a comfortable spot in battle. At Holowczyn, Karl's favourite battle (it should be - he attacked at night, across a major river, through a marsh against a numerically stronger enemy that had entrenched itself uphill - and won), they were in the first wave, one battalion crossing with Karl himself, a dubious honour shared with only the Lifeguard battalions. At Malatitze a few weeks later, it was the Dal regiment that Karl sent first to aid the Swedish regiments that had been surprised in camp, and it was the only one from the relief force to see actual fighting.

At Poltava, the Dal regiment was in the column of Major General Roos and was among the units that got caught up storming the Russian redoubts. They never made it to the main battle, as they and four other battalions were chased into the woods besides the redoubts, and then all the way down to a cloister overlooking Poltava itself. Here the remnants of Roos' group, including the Dal men, eventually surrendered, depriving the main army of a third of its infantry strength for the main battle.

After Poltava, the Dal regiment was reraised, surrendered at Tönningen with general Stenbock and was raised a third time to join in the 1717-1718 Norwegian campaigns that ended with the death of Karl (which to this day is highly controversial, but that's another story).
The Dal Regiment as they would have appeared at Poltava, though possibly much more scruffy looking. The figures are all Musketeer Miniatures, with a tiny conversion (head swap on the officer and NCO). The flags are printed scans from the Höglund book (see references). Painting by the author.

Uniform wise, the Dal regiment is an archetypical Swedish GNW unit: blue coat with yellow facings, leather vest and breeches and yellow stockings. Headdress is the equally archetypical Karpus, in this case blue faced yellow. Höglund notes that in 1707, new recruits sent to the Dal regiment had black hats (tricornes) and the reraised versions of the Dal regiment also wore hats instead of the karpus. I have however opted to represent my Swedish and Russian units as they would have appeared at the battle of Poltava, and have chosen the karpus for the Dal regiment, conveniently applying a bit of wargamer's license to forget about the hat wearing new recruits. 

Headwear for the grenadiers is mostly speculative. While it is more likely that the grenadiers wore hats just like the other musketeers, references to and examples of actual grenadier mitres used by Swedish units in the GNW do exist, and Höglund has the grenadiers of the Dal regiment as wearing 'grenadier caps of unknown appearance'. In my version of the regiment, I have thus opted for classical grenadier mitres.

That's all for the Dal regiment. Next is a regiment decidedly unarchetypical, sporting red facings instead of yellow.

References: 
The Great Northern War 1700 - 1721, Colours and Uniforms, Lars-Eric Höglund & Åke Sallnäs, Acedia Press, 2000
The Dawn of the Tsarist Empire: Poltava & the Russian Campaigns of 1708 - 1709, Nicholas A. Dorrell, Partizan Press, 2009
The Battle the Shook Europe: Poltava and the Birth of the Russian Empire, Peter Englund, I.B. Tauris, 2003

The Höglund book is the definitive source on unifoms & flags. The Dorrell book is very useful for concrete information on troop strengths & dispositions during the Russian campaign that translate directly to the tabletop, and the Englund book is the definitive history of the Poltava campaign.

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Beneath the Lily Banners Brigade Roster Sheets - Download Free!

Barry Hilton - Clarence and I have been delighted with the steady growth in Beneath the Lily Banners players. The rules have now sold an impressive 2,000 copies since their release in 2008. Not a blockbuster we'd be the first to admit but in wargaming rules terms this is a success and certainly the rules have been  commercial viable.

Part of the success has definitely been due to the way we have supported the rules via the Fighting Talk forum, through articles in the magazines, with published scenarios and explanations for players to get more of a feel for the period and for the mechanisms and thinking behind each rule idea.

Further traction has been gained by running our League of Augsburg weekend gaming extravaganzas and letting players get a sense for the period in a larger setting than can normally be achieved in a home game set up.

On the last weekender I introduced Brigade Roster Sheets which did a little more than record casualties and whether a unit had fired its First Volley. I attempted albeit in brief, to give a flavour of the brigade in a short narrative. A little background behind the wee lead chappies being pushed around the table and causing such heartache for the Gladiators in charge! This format also permitted some special scenario specific conditions to be noted for particular units or brigade commanders. Sometimes the conditions or special rules were advantageous and sometimes not! Further period character was instilled through long held grudges and the personality idiosyncrasies of colourful individuals.

A quick walk through the Roster will help users. In the top scroll should be placed the name of the brigade for example The Brigade of Count Solms. In the larger scroll area below an optional description of the brigade and its constituent units can be given. Any special rules pertaining to the units, weapons, opponents or commanders can be detailed here.

The sheet allows for four units to be recorded. The section with 18 boxes represents the total number of models in an infantry battalion. A line separates each group of 6 boxes. Each therefore represents a stand of models. When a casualty is received simply mark or cross the appropriate box on the grid.

Two scrolls on the right hand side of the grid allow players to note the unit type ie Pike and Shot or All Musket. The scroll below is used to note the training/morale level of the unit ie Drilled.

The small cloud of smoke on the top right of each grid is not a touch of frippery! In this cloud cross or write FV when the unit has delivered its crucial FIRST VOLLEY.

The grid can of course also be used for brigades of Horse. Each 6 box section of the grid represents a squadron. One, two and three squadron regiments can be accommodated on a single grid with the numbers 1,2 and 3 being noted at the top of each 6 box section to represent the appropriate squadron. A four squadron regiment will require the use of two grids. The scrolls on the right hand side of the grid can be used to note Bullet or Blade type together with the quality of the unit as per the infantry notation.

Artillery can be easily fitted into the grid system too.

Requests for access to these sheets by some attendees of the games led to Clarence volunteering to professionalize my amateurish Power Point effort. The result in my opinion, is very Harrisonesque and appealing! Here on this thread you can see the evolution from the raw form through to a filled in example through to a downloadable and extremely smooth professional version which is of course free! Use it as much as you like.


We hope it comes in useful. Thanks for requesting it, thanks for doing a bang up job Clarence!

More from us on BLB soon...

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

In the Shadows of History: Battle of Newtown, 31st July 1689: Part Seven


Scenario Option 1 The Battle of Newton – Historical re-fight
 Williamite Objective
You must drive the Jacobite Army from the field. Victory will be complete if you do so without losing more than 50% of your own strength

Jacobite Objective
You must hold position and repulse the imminent attack. Victory will be complete if you are able to counterattack and drive the Rebels off the field.

Deployment is shown on the accompanying map below. The game has a limit of 10 turns. As historical accounts are not specific about which flank the woods appeared on I have placed woods on both flanks.

Jacobite forces in action against a pursuing enemy

Scenario Option 2 The Battle of Newton – Hamilton returns!
Objectives and deployment are as per scenario option 1. The game has a limit of 10 turns

The potential return of the Jacobite vanguard.
Starting from the beginning of game turn 3 the Jacobite player is allowed to roll two D6 every turn. When the sum total of these rolls reaches 21, Brigadier Hamilton arrives back on the field having rallied his troops.

To determine exactly how many of the vanguard return roll a DAverage and consult the table below:
DAv score       Regimental size action                        Company size action
2                      1 squadron (Horse)                              4 troops (2 Horse, 2 Dragoons)

3                      2 squadrons (1 Horse, 1 Dragoon)      8 troops (3 Horse, 5 Dragoons)

4                      3 squadrons (1 Horse, 2 Dragoons)     12 troops (3 Horse, 9 Dragoons)

5                      All                                                       All

To determine precisely Hamilton’s point of arrival number the table edges 1-4. Dice using a D4 to locate the arrival. Now divide the chosen table edge into three equal sections. Roll a D3 to locate the precise point of entry. The vanguard will enter in line of troops or squadrons depending on the scenario scale chosen.

Map for Scenario One and Two


Terrain
The hill should be treated as gentle but giving an advantage to those on higher ground. BLB gives a +1 melee modifier for this. The morass should be impassable to horses and artillery. Foot should treat it as very difficult going and be disordered when in it. Some of the historical sources say that the ground in the morass had dried out sufficiently in the warm summer weather to allow the Protestant Horse to cross but for this scenario I have not allowed it. The woods should be difficult going for both horse and foot. The few buildings on the southern edge of Newtown and the woods should be treated as soft cover and could be represented as burned out cottages.

Table Size
If the regimental level game is played I recommend a 6 x 4 foot or 6 x 6 foot table. For the company level game which has far more units I would recommend an 8 x 6 or 10 x 6 foot table in 28mm scale. For a 15mm game these sizes could be reduced significantly.

Deployment
The accompanying map shows troop dispositions as far as can be determined from available sources. As a variation, players may actually wish to deploy one or two Jacobite regiments in column of march on the road out of Newton but about half way across the table. The Protestant foot can be deployed on the road also in March column but their dragoons and horse may be positioned forward of Newton and with a possibility of catching the enemy before they cross the causeway and form up with the rest of their army.


Scenario Option 3 The Battle of Newtown – Conjectural
In this scenario option the cavalry clash at Lisnaskea has never taken place and the two forces meet at full strength in open country north of Newtown.

Lay out a table on flat or gently rolling terrain. A road should run from one long table edge across and exit on the other. Each player must place three terrain features each from the following selection: Small wood, small hill, enclosure, small marshy area. Each player can choose up to three of the same type of terrain piece. Terrain pieces can be placed adjacent to each other. Once this is completed roll off for choice of long table edge. Winner chooses.  Players should then draw a map and mark on the disposition of their forces. When this is completed place all troops on the table and begin the game.


There is no turn limit on this scenario. The object for each side is to win the day.

Scenario Option 4 The Battle of Newtown – Conjectural with preliminary cavalry clash
In this final scenario option the cavalry clash at Lisnaskea is fought out before the main bodies meet. Set up a table as described in option 3. Dice for choice of table edge. Dice for initiative and the winner can choose to place a troop/squadron first or offer this to his opponent. Players should alternate placement until all troops are on the table.  The orders of battle for Hamilton and Berry’s vanguards should be used to form each force. Deployment can be anywhere up to the table midpoint on own side of table.

Surprise
To simulate the shock of two vanguards bumping into each other unexpectedly use the following method to decide which side keeps its head and maintains the initiative. Each player rolls a D6.  The player with the highest score is allowed a free move at the start of the game. This can involve declaring charges if any enemy troops or squadrons are within range. Charged units attempting to counter charge take their morale check at a +1(if BLB is used).For other rule sets modify morale test modifiers ‘to counter charge’ in a way that makes this more difficult for the force that has been surprised.

Fight five turns of play. The side which has the most intact squadrons by the end of T5 is deemed to have come off best in the fight. Any squadrons in rout or under 50% strength at the end of T5 are removed from play. Clear the table and follow the set up procedure described in Option 3 to create a new table set up. Once this is done the winner of the cavalry clash can choose which table side they wish to set up on and they can also make the opposing player deploy fully before they themselves deploy. The cavalry remaining intact at the end of the cavalry clash are added back into the main forces and can be deployed for battle.


Monday, August 26, 2013

Wee Bazza's BIG Boyne Quiz: How much do you really know?

Barry Hilton - The bi-partizan subculture has blighted Scottish society for too long and reduced a fascinating period of British history to an atavistic war between two (or is it four?) football teams. So, in an attempt to engage my countrymen in a challenge to their preconceptions, I ran this bit of fun as a hand-out when demonstrating the Battle of the Boyne wargame at a Scottish show a few years ago.
The response was very positive and I am still alive so, infer what you will from that little tale!

River Boyne where the Dutch crossed. Copyright B.Hilton 2013

Test your knowledge.. Just how much do you really know about the infamous Battle of the Boyne 1690? No cheating! Don’t scroll down below the second photo until you’ve answered all of your questions!

  1. What was the precise date of the Battle of the Boyne and where is the site?
  2. What relation was William III to his rival for the throne James VII & II?
  3. Why did Willem of Orange, Stadhouder of Holland really want to be King of England?
  4. Which Empire was William III’s most powerful ally in his wars against France?
  5. What nationality were the assault troops at Oldbridge (the main crossing point at the battle)?
  6. How many Protestant regiments fought against William III in Ireland?
  7. Were there Catholic troops in William’s army?
  8. How big were the armies the faced each other at the Boyne and what were the estimated casualties for both sides?
Russian Roulette at a Glasgow wargame show?

     HOW DID YOU DO?
ANSWERS  
  1. July 1st 1690. The alteration of Gregorian to Julian calendars seems to have confused people. The site is in the Republic of Ireland less than 2 miles west of Drogheda.
  2. He was James VII(II)’s son in law and nephew. William was married to James’s daughter Mary.
  3. Mainly he wanted to get his hands on the English Treasury and Army to fund and reinforce his important territorial wars against his real enemy Louis XIV of France.
  4. The Catholic Habsburg or Holy Roman Empire.
  5. Dutch – The Blew Guards or Gard te Voet. Followed by French Protestants (Huguenots) followed then by Danish infantry. English and Irish regiments played a supporting role and engaged later in the battle.
  6. Several regiments were under the command of Protestant nobility and gentry who remained loyal to their King.. James VII (II). There were undoubtedly Protestant in the Jacobite Army.
  7. Yes. The Dutch were relatively speaking, religiously tolerant and Catholics served in William’s Army.
  8. William’s approx: 35,000 with estimated 500 casualties. James’s approx: 20,000 with 1,500 estimated casualties. So, in the grand scheme relatively light casualties particularly when compared with Aughrim in 1691.
Some Easy Conversions
Terrain used to restage the Boyne at Oldbridge

Friday, August 23, 2013

FEATURED REGIMENT: Gard te Voet. Dutch Foot Guards

Old Glory models with tricorn.

Barry Hilton - The Dutch Foot Guards or Gard te Voet or Blew Guards is a regiment the name of which is writ large during the period 1688 - 1714. By reputation they were probably the superior Grand Alliance unit of the time and heavily involved in the major campaigns of William of Orange and on. My first encounter with the Blue Guards was as part of a friend's collection in 1992. I watch them stand resolutely in Laer as I threw battalion after battalion of French infantry against its impenetrable defences. I became fixated on annihilating them. Even though they had only three figures standing at the end of the battle I failed both to destroy them and to take Laer. Those glossy and very plain models stood taunting me behind the resin gabions which they had defended. A beacon marking my total failure to emulate Marechal Duc de Luxembourg's victory at Neerwinden in 1693.

Foundry models now serving in the USA.

Alasdair had used particularly stiffly posed Essex Miniatures models which to all of us looked extremely like old wooden clothes pegs! They became known as the 'clothes pegs' and a bogey unit for me to chase whenever commanding the legions of Le Roi Soliel which between 1992 and 1994. As I have come to learn at some cost over the years, no matter how poorly a model is sculpted or painted or based it has no effect whatsoever on their ability to win or annoy the life out of you in a wargame.

A Warfare Miniatures guardsman at rest.
I have never actually recorded the service history of any Gard te Voet battalions although I have painted at least four. I still own two but will probably sell those off when I finally finish a Warfare Miniatures version.

Warfare Miniatures GtV with 'yellow facings' by David Imrie

I have rubbed up against these lads many times on the table and usually come off worst. Having walked on the banks of the Boyne where they crossed under the fire of Jacobite infantry and looked from their the lines at Neerwinden when they stood valiantly but vainly against the Gardes Francaises, I must confess to a grudging admiration for these very tough soldiers.


The plainness of their dress without lace or feather seems completely in tune with the grim and desperate struggles they were involved in. In truth, I think far too little acknowledgement is accorded to the disciplined and determined Dutch infantry of the great wars against Louis XIV. Truly it was the Dutch who shouldered most of the responsibility to keep the megalomaniacal King of France in check.

A Warfare Miniatures sergeant painted by Brian Phillips

There still appears to be some doubt as to whether their facing colour was orange or red. I have seen them painted in a variety of facing colours including buff, yellow, pale orange, bright orange and red. I have seen their coats painted on shades from a pale grey blue through to deep navy, Were their neck cloths black or red or white? Which standards did they really carry in the different phases of their campaigns?  Warfare Miniatures offer 6 different variants and these are only for Ireland! Did they have three battalions or two and a detachment of cadets? Whatever the truth the Blew Guards are an iconic regiment and this post puts them once more in the spotlight.

Two Battalions of Reiver models in action!

Clarence has beaten me to the punch by producing his own Warfare Miniatures Gard te Voet battalions. This is what I have to aim for when I finally get around to producing the regiment. Clarence has chosen to show the lads with shouldered muskets, probably just prior to wading chest deep into the swift flowing River Boyne opposite Oldbridge.  The flags are from Quindia Studios and are available in the League of Augsburg shop! This regiment in focus shows seven different interpretations of colour, models and style.

Clarence's first battalion of Warfare Miniatures...
... and the second...
... A finally some Warfare Miniatures grenadiers.


Wednesday, August 21, 2013

In the Shadows of History: Battle of Newtown, 31st July 1689: Part Six

Orders of Battle for Regimental Scale Action Using Beneath the Lily Banners, 1644 or Any Other Appropriate Rules System.

 The Jacobite ‘Flying camp’ under Justin Macarthy Viscount  Montcashel
Vanguard under Brigadier Anthony Hamilton (Commander rating: Plodder)

Regiment of Dragoons (BLB rating: Raw) 4 squadrons
Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Drilled) 1 squadron

Main Body under Montcashel (Commander rating: Average)

Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Drilled) 1 squadron
Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes
Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes
Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes
Command shot (BLB rating Raw) 2 stands of muskets
Command shot (BLB rating Raw) 2 stands of muskets

OR
unhorsed Jacobite officer

Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Drilled) 1 squadron
Montcashel’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes
Dillon’Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes
Richard Butler’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes
Fielding’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes
O’ Bryan’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes
2 Light guns (BLB rating Raw)



The Enniskillen Garrison under Colonel Wolseley
Vanguard under Colonel Berry (Commander rating: Average)

Wolseley’s Horse (BLB rating Raw) 2 squadrons
Wynne’s Dragoons (BLB rating Raw) 2 squadrons

Main Body under Colonel Wolseley (Commander rating: Good)

Zachariah Tiffin’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes
Gustavus Hamilton’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes
Colonel Lloyd’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) 3 stands of muskets

Orders of Battle for company scale action using Beneath the Lily Banners, 1644 or any other appropriate rules system of choice.

The Jacobite ‘Flying camp’ under Justin Macarthy Viscount  Montcashel
Vanguard under Brigadier Anthony Hamilton (Commander rating: Plodder)

Regiment of Dragoons (BLB rating Raw) 13 troops of 6 figures
Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Drilled) 3 troops of 6 figures 

Main Body under Montcashel (Commander rating: Average)

Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Drilled) 3 troops of 6 figures

Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
1 company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
1 company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
1 company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)
OR
Montcashel’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
1 company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)
Dillon’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
1 company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)
Fielding’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
1 company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)
O’Bryan’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
1 company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)
Butler’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
1 company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets) 
2 Light guns (BLB rating Raw)

 The Enniskillen Garrison under Colonel Wolseley
Vanguard under Colonel Berry (Commander rating: Average)
Wolseley’s Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Raw) 6 troops of 6 figures
Wynne’s Regiment of Dragoons (BLB rating Raw) 6 troops of 6 figures

Main Body under Colonel Wolseley (Commander rating: Good)

Zachariah Tiffin’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
1 company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)
Gustavus Hamilton’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
1 company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)
Colonel Lloyd’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x 6 figures with pikes)
1 company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets) 

Monday, August 19, 2013

Column - Right!

Barry Hilton - Although not strictly speaking to do with our chosen blog period I thought it might be useful to give some idea of where I am concentrating my writing efforts outside of the WordTwister context.

I will continue to contribute articles to Wargames Illustrated as per usual. These normally revolve around a specific request for something to fit with a theme the magazine is running or a free choice piece based on what the LoA is doing at the time. Other content of this type is likely to appear over the coming months in another mag and also in Charles Grant's Wargamers Annual 2013.

In addition I have agreed to write a bi monthly column for Wargames Illustrated where the content is more based along the lines of what I call 'commentary' pieces. In other words, where I get on my high horse and poke a gentle digit between the ribs of some aspect of the hobby. An example from the past was the piece  'Warning, this hobby may contain nuts'  or travelling far further back in time 'Who's that bloke in the pot helmet?'.

That very bloke in the pot helmet!

Curiously, it is for these types of article that I get the most feedback for which I am always extremely grateful (except for the death threats and notes describing mutilation and decapitation). As recently as Claymore on 3rd August someone mentioned the pot helmet piece which was written more than 10 years ago. That felt nice! So, more gentle mocking but some serious points in there if you look hard enough.

The column is running under the title of Fighting Talk. Dan Faulconbridge informs me imitation is the sincerest form of flattery but from the look on his face at the time I don't think he really meant it. The first piece has already run and dealt with the issue of how units should be classified for morale purposes in scenarios.

We are considering re issuing some of the much older articles here but at the moment we are hardly short of content with CH, DOB and myself running on overdrive and pieces in the pipe from at least four further guest bloggers.

Thanks for sticking with us, the blog is really getting some traction now.

Saturday, August 17, 2013

My Blenheim Project - Rowe's Brigade

Ray King - Lt. General Lord Cutts commanded the allied left wing at Blenheim composed of twenty battalions and fourteen squadrons of English troops. His front line was the brigade of five battalions was commanded by General Rowe and they would lead the assault on the village of Blenheim.

Rowe's Regiment of Scots Fusiliers 
Lt.Colonel Commanding John Dalyell (K.I.A.)
Raised in 1678 and in 1751 renamed the 21st Foot "Royal Scots Fusiliers".
Their 1704 campaign establishment was 36 officers & 593 men. 
Painted by Bob Lorton.

Ingoldsby's Regiment of Welsh Fusiliers 
Lt.Colonel Commanding Jos Sabine (Wounded in Action)
Raised in 1689 and in 1751 renamed the 23rd Foot "Royal Welsh Fusiliers".
Their 1704 campaign establishment was 33 officers & 715 men.
Painted by Bob Lorton.

Lord North & Grey's Regiment of Foot 
Colonel Lord North (Wounded in Action), Lt.Colonel Henry Groves.
Raised in 1685 and in 1751 renamed the 10th Regiment of Foot.
Their 1704 campaign establishment was 40 officers & 592 men.
Painted by Ray King.

Howe's Regiment of Foot 
Lt.Colonel Commanding William Breton (Wounded in Action).
Raised in 1685 and in 1751 renamed the 15th Regiment of Foot.
Their 1704 campaign establishment was 39 officers & 577 men.
Painted by Bob Lorton.

Marlborough's Regiment of Foot 
Lt. Colonel Commanding William Tatton.
Raised in 1689 and in 1751 renamed 24th Foot Regiment the "South Wales Borderers"
Their 1704 campaign establishment was 35 officers & 562 men. 
Painted by Bob Lorton.
You can find more about the Blenheim project on the Fighting Talk Forum .For a quick way to see all of Ray's collection, type 'Blenheim' in the search bar at the top of the page! 

Friday, August 16, 2013

FEATURED REGIMENT: Gardes Francaises. King Louis's Battle Winners

Gardes Francaises - Veterans of 30 battles

Barry Hilton - I fell in love with the idea of the French Foot Guards the first time I saw them on a friend's wargames table in 1992. The figures were the very ones I used for my own regiment seen above; Dixons Sedgemoor infantry sculpted by Mark Copplestone. These characterful models are of course quite wrong for the royal Frenchmen in many areas; coat decoration, hats, equipment orientation and such like however, there was nothing else available at the time and they just looked great! My friend at the time had two battalions, gloss varnished but glorious and I wanted some. The figure on the far left of the front rank is the very first Grand Alliance period figure I ever painted and I still have him(and them). My regiment pictured had a tart up in the mid 90s when I solidified the painting style a little and was more definite with colours such as black and blue.

Of course, Warfare Miniatures are about to release our very own Gardes Francaises sculpted specifically for the glorious period between 1689 and 1697 when they swept all before them.

Why would you want such troops in your army? Well that seems almost a stupid question but not really. The Gardes Francaises were not held in reserve and for show. They were a key battlefield asset which often featured prominently in the attack. With six powerful battalions they provided Louis XIV's marshals with a sledgehammer with which to break down the enemy's door. At Neerwinden in 1693 they did just that, facilitating a great victory. Pikemen with armour, musketeers with dashing, ribbon and feather festooned attire the Garde of this period are even more attractive than Napoleon's famous Garde Imperiale.
 
My Gardes Francaises were painted in 1992. They have fought 30 actions and achieved two distinctions. Their average battle losses are 18%. They have captured the colours of Kirke's Lambs. Regrettably their own colours were lost once. Finest Hour: Engaging and bayonet charging Kirke's 'Lambs' at Neerhespen 1693. This was a scenario soon to be featured on the blog concerning the French pursuit(which never happened) after the great victory at Neerwinden.

Darkest Hour: Routing and losing their colours during the worst French collapse I've seen, a refight of Fontenoy placed in the Grand Alliance period- ugh! It is my plan to retire these fine fellows shortly to be replaced with a new battalion of Warfare Miniatures Gardes Francaises.


When Clarence and I were first putting together ideas for Beneath the Lily Banners I wanted the cover to illustrate the coup de grace delivered by the Gardes at Neerwinden. We then had a case of life imitating art imitating life. Clarence designed the cover from my idea of what I imagined the fighting around Laer may have looked like. From his cover art I then modelled a diorama of the cover! Here is the cover of BLB1 (now only available in PDF):

This chap is a minor conversion I did on a Front Rank model for the diorama:


Thursday, August 15, 2013

Evolution of Warfare Miniatures Gardes Francaises Models

These pikemen are being production moulded now

Barry Hilton - Clibinarium and I have discussed the final look of the Gardes Francaises at length and although we were both delighted with the pikemen, we were not totally comfortable with the musketeers. Clibinarium himself will post about the evolution of the musketeer sculpts soon but this brief note is here to let you know that they have been redesigned and will appear shortly on the blog. They will have more options than the first sculpts thus offering significant variety between multi battalion forces. The Gardes had six battalions.

The other good news is that the command pack is also designed but some further detailing work is underway. Here is a teaser shot to keep everyone going.

This also means that I'll have to speak very nicely to Mr Harrison as we would like to release the flags with the figures! Clarence, are you reading this?

More soon..

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

In the Shadows of History: Battle of Newtown, 31st July 1689. Part Five

The Williamite Force
Even less is known about the Williamite troops as Newtown if the majority of sources are considered. It is likely that they were mostly Enniskillen men as the town was a centre of Protestant resistance or at least that they were local to the County Fermanagh area. It is unlikely that they were uniformed as the regiments were recently raised as part of armed resistance and the area was subject to Jacobite focus and troop movements. A mention later in Sapherson’s book of Inniskilling men being extremely reluctant to swap their red coats taken from the Jacobites for new grey ones from England suggests a policy of acquisition through combat as opposed to supply and provisioning from the authorities or government. These garments were captured early in the war and the quantity was sufficient to clothe two companies who served in Zachariah Tiffin’s Regiment. It is extremely probable that they were in fact captured during the action at Newtown. Tiffin’s date of appointment as colonel of the regiment is 20th June 1689, roughly one month before the battle. His regiment was raised in Enniskillen and made up of local men who later fought at the Boyne and Namur in 1695. They marched into history as the 27th of Foot ‘The Inniskillings’. Other web histories stated that in 1689 the town raised foot and dragoons but no mention is made of Horse. I have crossed referenced several sources but could find no further detail. If Tiffin’s regiment conformed to the norm they would have accounted for 920 men or roughly one third of Wolseley’s force. 

Dragoons are mentioned and in the clash at Lisnaskea mounted men under Berry chased off Hamilton’s dragoons or horse. There is also mention in at least one source of the Protestants using their cavalry to cross the causeway after the Jacobite guns had been cleared by the infantry moving through the bog.  It is possible but not likely that a smaller force of dragoons or horse may have been able to chase away nearly 1,000 Jacobite dragoons as Lisnaskea. Again here I am using logic and probability to deduce as opposed to fact and I would concede that stranger things have happened but it is more likely that the forces were evenly matched. If the Protestant units were raised in line with regulation then two regiments may have met Hamilton’s thirteen troops. I have decided to make these one each of horse and dragoons each having 6 troops or two squadrons. This leaves us with roughly 1,000 unaccounted for troops. The easiest solution is to provide Wolseley with another large regiment of foot.

Again I have left the data from the re enactors website till last. They state that the following Williamite units were at Newtown; Wolseley’s Horse, Wynne’s Dragoons, Gustavus Hamilton’s, Zachariah Tiffin’s & Colonel Lloyd’s regiments of Foot. This actually tallies a lot closer with what I have discovered by crossing referring other sources. The men are all stated to be Enniskilleners and at typical strengths for the war in Ireland the totals would be around 900 of Horse and dragoons and 2,100-2,200 foot making the 3,000 estimates stated elsewhere believable.  My recommendation is that gamers go with this orbat which allows for typically sized regiments and not with the less numerous larger sized regimental theory of the previous paragraph.

The troops ratings for both sides are arbitrary but reflect the fact that the conflict had not long started, most of the Protestant regiments were less than one month old and that the efforts of both sides had exhibited amateurism both at leadership and company level. The Jacobite Horse are widely accepted to have been disciplined, brave and formidable in relative terms. I have listed the Beneath the Lily Banners morale classes and suggest that if BLB is used to play the game at regimental level, players make sure each foot regiment has a central stand of pikemen and is only allowed to fire muskets with two stands of figures.



Tuesday, August 13, 2013

BLB1 Playsheet

The first edition of Beneath the Lily Banners has long been out of print, but it is still for sale as a PDF. Most of the core rules are the same and it's a great way to try BLB at a reduced price. Something that has not been available on PDF was the Quick Play Sheet... until now!


 We'll see about making the QRS for BLB2 available as well...

Monday, August 12, 2013

King William's War

David O'Brien - Following on from my previous article, Paint your Wagon here is a scenario that shows wagons not only in action but taking the prime spot in the action.

This action takes place somewhere in North America in the 1680's and pits English armed frontiersmen and soldiers facing off against native Americans. The English forces have been off raiding French settlements and two wagon loads of booty are being carted back to their own territory, unfortunately the natives can spot an easy target when it comes within reach.
The map above shows the type of terrain the game is fought on and the table size is a 4x4. The English forces enter from point A and have to get the wagons off at either point B or C to win the game, the natives have to raid the wagons to get a victory

English Force commanded by me
Hero.
3 x 8 drilled soldiers with an officer and two sergeants attached to these units
2 x wagons, the 2 wheeled wagon has 2 crew and the 4 wheeled wagons has 4 crew
12 recruit class militia with an officer attached
There was also a small recruit force of civilians guarding the village but they would only fight if the natives attacked them, they could not leave the settlement and could not shoot in support of my men.


Native Force commanded by Bob Talbot
Chief Togee
4 veteran warriors with Great Warrior attached
3 x 8 drilled warrior units with a shaman and 2 weapon masters attached
12 recruit class young warriors with a Fearless One attached

These were just the forces we used but if you have enough figures then feel free to use more drilled warriors or if you're feeling rash why not try five units of young warriors.

We diced for where the natives had to set up and they ended up in the positions marked on the map, they had to be at least 12" away from the road and away from the clearing around the settlement. Every unit, each wagon and each character had its own card for movement as well as a reload and end of move card. The English militia unit would only appear after the third move and needed a 10+ on 2d6 to arrive with an extra point being added each turn, once they arrived they were diced to see if they would arrive at B or C.

The game started well for the English as the first native warband 1 unsuccessfully attacked the first units onto the table and were in turn counter attacked and destroyed by two drilled English units.

 
Meanwhile the native warband unit 2 moved across the road and joined the young braves and veteran to block exit point B which had been my preferred exit point so I changed my plan and headed for point C. I had thought this would have been a good decision as the majority of natives were now around point B and when my militia arrived at that point I thought I could use them as a sacrificial unit to tie up as many natives as I could. Unfortunately things started to unravel as either the wagon cards didn't come out or wagon 2 would come up but it couldn't move past wagon 1 and as I couldn't leave the wagons undefended it also slowed up my infantry units. Who came up with this stupid scenario in the first place??? The militia didn't perform there job very well either as after taking out 2 of the veteran natives and the great warrior in the first round of combat they failed to hit anyone in the second round of combat and promptly failed their morale test, especially with the War Whoop going on in the forest around them. Even worse was that it now released the natives to move back to cut off the road to exit C.

As my troops slowly plodded on to exit point C the natives started to close in from both sides and fierce hand to hand combat and fire fights erupted up and down the road with many deaths on both sides and many warriors went to the happy hunting grounds in the clouds.


The crew of wagon 1 had been wiped out by this time and the wagon captured by the natives but quickly recaptured by the English and just as quickly lost again. By this point in the game the natives only had warband 3 surviving and the English only had half of drilled unit 3 left and both wagons had not lost their crews and the natives were closing in. It was now turn 17 and as I was about to move my last troops in to save the wagons they went down in a hail of arrows and below shows the final outcome of what was a fun filled game with the final outcome in the balance until that final move.


There are a few variations that can be added to the game and we used the first one in our playtest.

1. The Young Warriors have to test every move to see if they stick to the plan to capture the wagon or get distracted and decide to attack the homestead instead. I would suggest they have to pass a morale test to carry on against the wagons. If you wanted you could even have all the natives troops having to make this test but I would suggest that if they pass the test in the first move they can then act as they want for the rest of the game.

2. I would recommend that you only use one card for the wagons and that both wagons get to move when the card comes up, this would stop some of the delays in our game where the rear wagon couldn't move because the card for wagon 1 hadn't come up.

3. Another option if you have the models is to use three wagons which would be worth 10, 20 and 30 victory points, these should be marked down before the game starts and only the English player knows which wagon carries which points.

4. The usual rule for testing for the end of the game when a force loses 50% of its troops was not used in our game as we wanted to concentrate on the wagons but feel free to use it in your games if you wish.

5. We had originally decided to have a time limit of 15 moves on this game but as the lead wagon had only managed to move 6" by the beginning of turn 5 we decided to drop the idea but if you use the option of one card allowing all the wagons to move then perhaps a time limit before darkness falls would add even more excitement to the action.

As usual, if anyone tries fighting this scenario I hope you enjoy it as much as we did and I would love to hear how you got on and any other ideas that you might have added to the scenario.

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