Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Battle for Britain Part 3 - the Jacobite Commands

The climactic Battle of Badon Hill

Continuing the story of our mini campaign of the battle for Britain in 1692 created around an alternative history post July 12, 1691.

Creating the forces for each commander was enjoyable and challenging in equal measure. I had to think about balancing the number, quality, fighting style, weaponry and durability with the character of the commander and the player personalities (each of whom I am pretty familiar with).


Scots Dragoons operating in the Middle March of the Borders in July 1692


The size of force was roughly equivalent to between three and four brigades. The number of units was influenced by their armament and the quality/proportion of their weapons.

Many of the units were named historical formations such as the Scots Dutch Brigade or the Highland clans of Cameron and Macdonald. I created some imaginary units such as The Earl of Dunfermline's Regiment of Foot, The Oxford City Volunteer Cavalry, The Monmouthshire Fuzileers and Colonel Robert Lundie's Fuzileers (this infamous historical character finding himself serving with the Jacobite Army following his escape from Derry).

Privateers bombarded Berwick town and Lochiel almost escaped captivity as a result

With the acquisition of plunder, variable sized war chests, looting and recruitment amongst the player group we saw the formation of new regiments on player requests. These included Colonel Blakeney-Edwards Regiment of Horse, Colonel Polrowan's English Guards (a Cornish volunteer unit recruited by the Jacobites to send the political signal that King James had a regiment of 'English' Guards under command), The London Gentlemen Volunteer Cuirassiers, Lord Forbes Highland Regiment (fighting for King William), The Lancashire Volunteers and 2nd Battalion of Sir Maurice Eustace's Regiment.

The Lancashire Volunteers turned out for King James


In this first focus on players' forces we are looking in detail at two of the commands the first of which is a fairly conventionally constructed Jacobite force.

Lieutenant General Richard Hamilton's Command

Richard Hamilton was the general who conducted the first military campaign of the war, marching from Dublin through Ulster and reaching Derry in April 1689. I decided to make him a central stabilizing figure in the Jacobite command who lands in western Cornwall accompanied by The Duke of Berwick. His force was composed of mostly experienced Irish troops.

Lord Galmoy's Brigade

Lord Galmoy's Regiment of Horse: An Irish cavalry regiment of 12 models. Classed as Blade Horse. Graded as Veteran and given the suffix of Elite.
Colonel Parker's Regiment of Horse: An Irish cavalry regiment of 12 models. Classed as Blade Horse. Graded as Drilled.

Independent Command

Colonel Tyler's Regiment of Dragoons: A mounted Irish regiment of 12 models. Graded as Drilled and armed with flintlocks.

General Richard Hamilton's Command

The King's Brigade under Sir Michael Creagh, Mayor of Dublin

1st Battalion, The King's Regiment of Foot: An Irish regiment of 18 models. Formed as 'Regulation' ie the standard proportion of pike to shot. Equipped with flintlock muskets. Graded as Drilled and given the suffix of Elite.
2nd Battalion, The King's Regiment of Foot: An Irish regiment of 18 models. Formed as 'Regulation' ie the standard proportion of pike to shot. Equipped with flintlock muskets. Graded as Drilled and given the suffix of Elite.
Colonel John Hamilton's Regiment of Foot: An Irish regiment of 18 models. Formed as 'Regulation' ie the standard proportion of pike to shot. Graded as Drilled.
Sir Michael Creagh's Regiment of Foot: An Irish regiment of 18 models. Formed as 'Regulation' ie the standard proportion of pike to shot. Graded as Drilled.

Some Jacobite units were still poorly equipped and trained


Richard Nugent's Brigade

The Earl of Clancarty's Regiment of Foot: An Irish regiment of 18 models. Formed as 'Regulation' ie the standard proportion of pike to shot. Graded as Drilled.
Sir John Fitzgerald's Regiment of Foot: An Irish regiment of 18 models. Formed as 'Pike & Shot' ie a higher proportion of pike to shot. Graded as Raw.
Colonel Richard Nugent's Regiment of Foot: An Irish regiment of 18 models. Formed as 'Pike & Shot' ie a higher proportion of pike to shot. Graded as Drilled*.
Colonel Richard Butler's Regiment of Foot: An Irish regiment of 18 models. Formed as 'All musket'  with no pikes. Graded as Drilled.

*Nugent's were recalled to Ireland in the first month of the campaign.

The second command is less conventional, that of

Viscount Dundee

Of course Dundee died in 1689 at Killiecrankie but I warped history and had him survive the bullet to recover and re enter King James's service as his Generalissimo in Scotland.

Scots soldiers from the English army deserted and rallied to Dundee at Moffat


Brigadier Graham's Brigade

Viscount Dundee's Regiment of Horse: A Scots regular cavalry regiment of 6 models. Classed as Bullet Horse. Graded as Drilled and escort to the King's standard in Scotland.
Lord Gordon's Gentlemen Volunteer Regiment of Horse: A regiment of Scottish gentlemen at arms comprising 6 models. Classed as Bullet Horse. Graded as Raw.

Independent Command

Colonel Cannon's Regiment of Dragoons: A dismounted Irish regiment of 12 models. Graded as Drilled and armed with flintlocks.

Brigadier Cameron of Lochiel's Brigade

Cameron of Lochiel's Bodyguard: A Highland regiment of 12 models. Graded as Drilled and given the suffix of Elite.
Macdonalds of Glengarry: A Highland regiment of 18 models. Graded as Drilled.
Macdonalds of Clanranald: A Highland regiment of 12 models. Graded as Raw.
Macdonalds of Sleat: A Highland regiment of 12 models. Graded as Raw.
Sir Alexander Maclean's Regiment: A Highland regiment of 12 models. Graded as Drilled.

Viscount Dundee's unconventional command

The Lord Gordon's Brigade

The Lord Gordon's Regiment of Foot: A Scots regiment of 18 models recruited from the north east. Formed as 'Pike & Shot' ie a higher proportion of pike to shot. Graded as Raw.
The Earl of Dunfermline's Regiment of Foot: A Scots regiment of 18 models recruited from the central lowlands. Formed as 'All pike' ie a containing a negligible number of muskets. Graded as Raw.
The Earl of Seaforth's Regiment of Foot: A Highland Scots regiment of 18 models equipped in the conventional manner for lowland infantry. Formed as 'All musket' ie a containing no pikes and carrying flintlock muskets purchased personally by the Earl. Graded as Raw.
The Earl of Dumbarton's Regiment of Foot: A Scots regiment of 13 models raised from the veteran's of the army who stayed loyal to King James and who rallied to the colours at Moffat. Formed as 'All musket'  with no pikes. Graded as Drilled.

Lord Galmoy had built a fearsome reputation in Ireland between 1688-91

A further four Jacobite commands participated in the campaign: General Wauchope's , The Duke of Berwick's, General Sarsfield's and General Sheldon's. The final command was that of the Marquis de St Ruhe which will feature separately. 

9 comments:

  1. All great stuff Barry and looking forward to further updates and seeing that my troops in Hamilton's command performed well.

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  2. Such a nice place to game over a weekend *sigh*
    Barry? Could it be that two shot are actual taken at Historicon?
    (Privateer and Lord Galmoy)

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  3. Good shooting Gunter! I included them for 'period colour'. Another two were taken at different locations and times also.

    Thanks Dave - lots more coming! Thought you might have spotted your chaps in there!

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  4. They served me very well and looked good doing so (thank you.) I won't go into any details so as not to risk any "spoilers" of Barry's future blog posts...

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    Replies
    1. The officers would be thankful that Colin wasn't commanding them. 8-)

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  5. Excellent! Your figs are breathtaking.

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  6. thanks - not all mine in the big battles. Some of the players wanted to bring their own commands so we had models from 10 collections at the weekender

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  7. It was a great weekend. Thanks to Barry and Bob for all the effort and time that went into the organisation of such an inspiring event. Despite, perhaps because of all the chicanery and double-dealing that went on - my own nephew!- the atmosphere was always fun and enjoyable. Lots of laughter... No rules obsessives - just ' what do we think would have happened' so that the game flows and we all have a good time. This attitude is one of the great strengths of the LoA...

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  8. Yes, being harangued by your kin must have been somewhat upsetting my Lord! Didn't he at one point demand you imprisonment or worse? What would his Mum have said to him when he got home! Don't be so horrid to your Uncle Johnny! 😧

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